A Majestic Log Home That Will Make You Believe in Fairy-Tales

This "Majestic Log Home" is surrounded by big beautiful trees and forest, it's the perfect spot to have a log home. The exterior of this log home is stunning, with lots of windows, a covered front porch and stonework, that fits in perfectly with it's natural location.

This site shares a love of rustic cabin life through photos and art that have collected been collected along the way. On this site you will find plenty of log home inspirations and ideas from lakeside log cabins, countryside log cabins, log cabin great rooms, antique country stoves, rustic log cabin kitchens, log cabin porches, lakeside campfires, nature inspired paintings, log cabins, marshmallows roasting over campfires, antique wood stoves, stone fireplaces, log cabin patios, spiral staircases, rustic homesteading cabins, log cabins and log homes from all over the world, and plenty of country inspiration.

Log construction was the most common building technique in large regions of Sweden, Finland, Norway, the Baltic states and Russia, where straight and tall coniferous trees, such as pine and spruce, were readily available. It was also widely used for vernacular buildings in Eastern Central Europe, the Alps, the Balkans and parts of Asia, where similar climatic conditions were present. In the warmer and more westerly regions of Europe, where deciduous trees were more dominant, timber framing was favoured instead.

Some of the different types of log homes can include; handcrafted, which are typically made of logs that have been peeled, but essentially unchanged from their original appearance as trees; hewn logs, logs that are hewn by an axe to an oval, hexagonal, octagonal or rectangular section; sawn logs, logs that are sawn to a standard width, but with their original heights; milled (also known as machine profiled), made with a log house moulder, made with logs that have been run through a manufacturing process which then converts them into timbers which are consistent in size and appearance. Handcrafted log houses have been built for centuries in Scandinavia, Russia and Eastern Europe, and were typically built using only an axe and knife. The Scandinavian settlers of New Sweden brought the craft to North America in the early 18th century, where it was quickly adopted by other colonists and Native Americans. Possibly the oldest surviving log house in the United States is the C. A. Nothnagle Log House (circa 1640) in New Jersey.

Some of the different types of construction for log cabins include; Scandinavian Full Scribe, which is also known as the chinless method, is where naturally shaped, smoothly peeled logs that have been scribed and custom fitted to each other. The logs are notched where they overlap at the corners of the house, and there are several ways to notch the logs. The flat on flat method of log home building, is where the logs are flattened on the top and the bottom and then they are stacked on top of each other. Milled log houses are constructed with a tongue and groove system of log home building which helps align one log to another, creating a system that in turn seals out the outdoor elements. The tight pinned butt and pass method, are when the logs are not notched or milled in any way. The logs are in a single course and do not overlap, with vertical pairs of logs that are fastened together with tight, load bearing steel pins.


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